Mind Your Health

Andrey Reich

Mind Your Health—this year’s theme for May is Mental Health Month—calls attention to the importance of mental health to overall health and wellness.

“We know that mental health is integral to overall health,” said Audrey Reich, Behavioral Health Program Manager for SLV Health. “People need to care for their mental health so they can respond to the stress of daily life and the challenges it presents.”

“This Mental Health Month, we are encouraging everyone to learn about steps they can take to protect their mental health and balance both mind and body.”

Mental Health America has developed a series of fact sheets available on its website (http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/may) on steps anyone can take to improve their overall mental health and well-being and on how to get help when needed. These are:

Alcohol Use and Abuse
Building Social Support
Supplements: Weighing Benefits and Risks
Healthy Diet: Eating with Mental Health in Mind
Getting Help (signs help is needed, types of providers, etc.)
Stress: Coping with Everyday Problems
Rest, Relaxation and Exercise

May is Mental Health Month was started 65 years ago by Mental Health America, to raise awareness about mental health conditions and the importance of good mental health for everyone.

‘When a person has ‘good’ mental health, they deal better with what comes their way,” says Reich.  “By contrast, ‘poor’ mental health—such as feeling overwhelmed by stress —can make even day-to-day life difficult.

Reich said research shows that stress is closely linked to high blood pressure, heart disease, and obesity. It also shows that people who feel depressed or chronically stressed may have a greater risk of physical illnesses.

“The good news is there are many healthy choices and steps that individuals can adopt to promote and strengthen mental health—and overall health and well-being,” Reich said.

Building social support, eating with your mental health in mind, and stress management are important steps that promote good mental health, Reich said.

“Just as Americans have learned there are things they can do to reduce their risk of heart disease and chronic illnesses, we want to help people learn what they can do both to protect their mental health in tough times and also to improve their mental well-being throughout their lives.”

For more information on May is Mental Health Month, visit Mental Health America’s website at www.mentalhealthamerica.net